Concrete Engraving

Using an air compressor, custom pneumatic cutting tools, and a heavy-duty plastic template, text, images and designs, such as patterned borders, room motif accents, emblems, and logos, can be precisely and efficiently engraved into horizontal concrete flatwork - indoors or outside.  Decorative concrete engraving becomes a permanent, distinctive part of the concrete surface (similar to design work seen on tombstones and stone residential subdivision entry markers) and at only an approximate depth of 1/16" does not present a trip or safety hazard.  Individual elements of an image or design may be colored through the use of acid-stains, concrete dyes or water-based acrylic stains, either before or after the engraving process.  Images and designs may be chosen from a preset catalog or may be converted from any electronic or computer image file.

The first set of photos below shows a project outside the main entry of a church in Sterling Heights, Michigan:  a Bible verse from the Gospel of Matthew being engraved into a specially poured section of concrete that has been pre-colored with acid stain.

 Acid-Stained Concrete Church Entryway During Engraving Of Bible Verse Using Plastic Template
 Closeup View of Acid-Stained Concrete with Engraved Bible Verse
 Acid-Stained Concrete Church Entryway With Engrave Bible Verse And Clear Sealer

The second set of photos below shows the sketch of a design on an heirloom jewelry case being reproduced on the main floor of an Irish pub in Farmington, Michigan, as a room motif accent.  You can read more about the concrete engraving process and see a catalog of available templates on the Engrave-A-Crete company web site.  Premier Veneers uses Engrave-A-Crete tools and templates.

 A chronological view of the concrete engraving process shows: 1) a jewelry case; 2) the starting artwork; 3) the transfer and imprint of the image to floor; 4) the engraving & staining; and 5) final engraving with protective clear sealer.  It is a precise and beautiful process from start to finish.

A chronological view of the concrete engraving process shows: 1) a jewelry case; 2) the starting artwork; 3) the transfer and imprint of the image to floor; 4) the engraving & staining; and 5) final engraving with protective clear sealer.  It is a precise and beautiful process from start to finish.

Best of all, the engraving process produces little to no concrete dust - the cement particles that are removed during pneumatic cutting are large and heavy enough that they do not become airborne or present a respiratory hazard.  We simply vacuum them up with a standard shop vac fitted with HEPA bag and cartridge filters.

There are other "non-pneumatic" concrete engraving systems on the market, including from Engrave-A-Crete, but they are either less precise and effective, such as automated or robotic engraving machines, or generally so elaborate and cost prohibitive that you would only find them in use with someone who does concrete engraving full time - for example, sandblasting or shot-blasting engraving machinery.  The equipment and system Premier Veneers uses from Engrave-A-Crete is versatile, portable, precise and affordable.